V1030: A tale of two dresses

I’m not quite sure that sewing dresses for your bridesmaids counts as selfless sewing (as really, it’s technically for me), but I’m so totally claiming it.

If I was humbled that both women were willing to wear something I made, then their trust in me throughout the muslin phase bowled me over even more. It’s hard enough for a non-sewing enthusiast to understand just how much sewing means to me, let alone be forced into wearing one of my creations. I remember doing one of the fitting sessions in front of a group of friends – one of the on-lookers genuinely thought I was going to make them wear a dress made of muslin. …..”Oh, I didn’t realise you were going for such a rustic theme”….

Ha!

My third bridesmaid, technically a bridesman – escaped the whole process. Although the poor man often got confused as my betrothed when accompanying me on official bridesmaid duties such as visiting florists and trying on dresses. It was funny! I did briefly consider attempting to make a tie for him, but lumped that idea pretty quick when time got tight! So I’d like to introduce you all to Nikoo, Andrea and Lev-Ari:

w140412_101

 

w140412_066

w140412_103

w140412_265

w140412_335

w140412_332

we were, of course - the Perfect Match! ;)

we were, of course – the Perfect Match! ;)

I had picked out Vogue 1030 as pattern I rather liked, and both girls were kind enough to deem it acceptable… once I’d explained that I would be able to alter the design to provide some additional coverage  – this pattern in it’s original form has one helluva plunging neckline.

This pattern certainly had its moments. I think the most difficult part was that it calls for silk chiffon or silk double georgette that is 60″ wide. Those fabrics in that width? Difficult to find generally, and nigh on impossible to find in a colour of your choosing! The skirt has both fabric and lining pattern pieces – the lining (silk crepe de chine or georgette are recommended) is effectively an exaggerated A-line skirt, whilst the overskirt (chiffon or double georgette recommended) has a train and angular side seam, which is the reason the super wide fabric is required. Upon realising this I decided it would be practical both from a wearing and fabric width point of view to keep the hem at floor length – removing the need for super-wide width and giving me far more flexibility in fabric choice.

Once we’d all agreed on on two potential colour palettes I started the fabric recon, and was disappointed at every turn. As you can see from the photos, both Andy and Nikoo have distinctly different skin tones – and I felt they’d look their best in different hues of the same colour – and I simply could not find two double georgettes in the right shades! I pinned all my hopes on my fabric shopping expedition in New York, and even there I struggled to get a match.

I did eventually spot silks in the colours I was after in Mood – what a crazy place. I know a lot of people rave about Mood, but it just didn’t do it for me – I’m so much more a B&J girl! I deliberated on the silks for a day as one was a crepe de chin, the other tagged as a charmuese (we’ll get to that in a moment) – really rather different from georgette. Oh, and the darker silk was on hold – someone was planning to buy the whole bolt. But the colours were so perfect for both the girls and my personal taste, and when I went back in just before closing and the bolt was still there, it was a done deal! Whilst my yardage was being cut, the girl told me both were Ralph Lauren silks – it made sense both were from the same place given how well the hues matched. I recall a fleeting concerned thought at how the lightweight ‘charmuese’ would work, but in the excitement of finding the right colours that thought got pushed from view. Jetlag probably had something to do with that too – it’s like a wierd mix of feeling both drunk and hungover at the same time – I think I may have lost my balance whilst standing upright when perusing fabric because of this, but noone saw so it never happened, right?

w140412_184

w140412_182a

w140412_431

w140412_588

w140412_684

I made a muslin for both girls and was really, really challenged at having to fit them both. Even though they both had virtually identical B-W-H measurements, their proportions are vastly different. The skirt was always going to be easy as it’s so free-flowing – but the pattern bodice has a lining, and underbodice piece and an overbodice piece which incorporates the gathering around the edge of the neckline – and for the life of me I just couldn’t figure out how to adjust the pattern to get a good bodice fit without impacting the gathered portion. I had limited time to spend fitting both girls as they don’t live close by, so I ended up scratching the overbodice pattern piece (and thus, the gathering around the neckline) and not taking the risk that it might not work.

I was to extend the ruffle around the neck down to give coverage, and also raise up the trapezium shaped pattern piece joining the bodice fronts to make it more of a modesty panel – onto which the ruffles would be tacked to hold them in place. It turned out that I probably only needed to extend the ruffles as they gave plenty of modesty, but hey. I kept the gathers on the centre trapezium shaped piece the same to keep with the look.

The 'extended' trapezium as viewed from the inside - the stitch line across the bodice shows where it would have originally stopped.

The ‘extended’ trapezium as viewed from the inside – the stitch line across the bodice shows where it would have originally stopped. This was after the final fitting – we decided to cut back the armscye a little on Nikoo’s dress which you can see by the pencilled in adjustment.

I extended the ruffles right down to where the original trapezium centre stopped. In the end you can't even see the modesty panel.

I extended the ruffles right down to where the original trapezium centre stopped. In the end you can’t even really see the modesty panel.

THE BODICE:
I started on the darker green ‘charmuese’ dress first. And that’s when I realised – this was no charmuese. It was the lightest, most loosely woven silk habutai I’d ever come across. It was Hell Spawn Habutai. Throw a fluffy feather and a piece of this in the air and the feather would land first with time to kill. It was so lightweight and fluttery and insanely sheer that even when 2 layers were laid out on my cutting mat with a silk organza underlining pattern piece on top – I COULD STILL CLEARLY SEE THE GRID LINES ON MY CUTTING MAT. I shit you not.

My second realisation – trying to align the grainline of this fabric was like trying to get a nappy on a wriggly toddler that just will not stand for having their nappy changed. I ended up taping down the selvedge, then finding the cross grain by using the thread-pull technique, before taping that down the cross-grain on the cutting mat too. Then pinning on my organza pattern pieces and thread-tracing blah etc blah blah. It was a nightmare.

Vogue 1030 2

Playing hide and seek with the cross grain…

Vogue 1030 4

At the end of cutting out the bodice pieces (none of which had bubbles indicating the grain had tricked me – woooo!!!!) I rewarded myself with a rather stiff G&T. Then came back the next day for more punishment to cut out the skirt pieces. I think I spent nearly 3 full days just cutting out this one dress. I used every single trick in the proverbial sewing book to keep this fabric in line – basting was my best friend. After spending a full Saturday cutting out and basting together the ruffle alone (I had a hunch that the ruffle would sit more beautifully if I underlined it with itself) I was greeted with the sight of possibly the most beauteous of ruffles that has ever existed. It draped, flopped and rolled in such a way that washed away all my despair at ever getting this dress to look like I wanted it too. I mean, just look at it in the photo here:

w140412_336

If I had one regret from these two dresses, it’s that I had already cut and gathered the ruffle in Andrea’s dress with just a single layer of fabric. And I just didn’t have the time to do it again…

I then realised it would have been amazing if I could also underline the skirt in self fabric, but I didn’t have enough and I’d already sewn the skirt together by this stage so it was never going to be. Ah well!

THE SKIRT:
With the skirt – I sewed french seams using tissue paper to hold the hellspawn habutai fabric sturdy under my presser foot, because I just couldn’t find a way to sew a seam without it looking utterly terrible. Altering thread tension minimised only slightly the chewed up look a sewn seam gave the fabric. My machine is a base computerised model (Janome DC2101) and doesn’t have the option to adjust presser foot tension – I’m not sure if this would affect it but I’d love to know!

Vogue 1030 3

One those seams were sewn, I hung the skirt up to let everything settle. I realised at this point that my adjustments to the over skirt weren’t really all that well thought out – sure, I’d removed the train by simply cutting it off, but I hadn’t factored in that the side seam of the skirt might be angled in such a way so as to support the weight of the train – meaning my french seamed skirt looked incredibly, horribly and devastatingly ugly:

IMG_7245

Yes. We all know what this looks like, but we’re too polite to say it, right?

DISASTER!

At least, I’m assuming it’s my fault. I did flatter myself for a moment with the thought that maybe I could see the hint of the same effect/drag lines in the picture on the pattern envelope, but figured people would have mentioned it in their pattern reviews if that was the case.

I let it sit like this whilst I pondered it for a few days. Really annoyed at myself for taking the shortcut of muslining the underskirt only, I figured it would have to remain as is because unpicking would ruin the skirt, and whilst I bought an extra meter of fabric as contingency, that wasn’t going to be nearly enough. Maybe somehow when Nikoo put it on, it would all be ok.

ERRRR – No.

It looked even worse on and she totally freaked out. We all have our least favourite body part and hips are hers – and this f’ugly seam drew your attention right there and would not let you go. And the image stuck with you even once you’d turned your back on it.

I had no choice but to alter it. I tested my proposed changes first in some scrap poly silk, then gently and super-carefully unpicked, realigned on my pattern piece and sliced the offending angle off. You can sort of see exactly how shifty-shifty the grain is from the off-cut on the right:

photo

Then I carefully re-sewed the french seams. I can’t even begin to describe my frustration here – the only positive I can take from it was that I could at least save myself more pain by adjusting the lighter green dress skirt panels pattern before cutting that one out.

As much hurt, angst and frustration that this habutai fabric caused me – I absolutely love it. It has stunning sheen, drapes in such a lustful manner and is the most perfect shade of apple green – and suits Nikoo to an absolute tee.

You can see in this photo the offending seam ended up being quite easy on the eye!

w140412_301

The side seams, still being slightly on the bias – did drop somewhat. Obviously, the looser woven Hellspawn Habutai dropped much farther than the delightfully well-behaved crepe de chin.

IMG_1741

Hemming was a case of using my piece of altered plastic belt backing to sew a miniture hem without the seams being chewed up by my machine. It involved a lot of patience on the wearer’s behalf, standing still whilst I pinned in place the ideal hem location!

Another interesting thing from a non-sewists point of view… both girls were quite visibly shocked at how ‘different’ each dress looked on a hanger. Well yeah… that’s because they both have very different body shapes, and each dress has been altered to suit that. Andrea was longer in the body and is the classic rectangle shape, whilst Nikoo is really very petite through the torso (you can see this in the shape of the armscye on both dresses below) and pear shaped, evidenced by what appears to be the curved hem when sitting flat. And yet, they are the same height and have exactly the same B-W-H sizes. When they’re being worn, you probably wouldn’t notice any of those things. This is why we sew right?

IMG_7344

WAIST GATHERING
The panels at the waist are not structural – they are aesthetic additions onto the bodice and sit above the seam line between the bodice and the skirt. The panels are cut on the bias then machine gathered at each end and attached to the dress between the center back seam and the seam alongside the trapezium shaped piece at the centre front.

At least, that’s what the pattern instructions would have you do. I noticed on a few of the pattern reviews of this pattern that the gathering looked a little saggy – which was not something I wanted to replicate. This kind of gathering always looks better under tension!

I pinned my gathered panels in place then used some matching silk thread to ‘lock’ them in place, which was a something I noticed on a Colette Dinnigan dress I own that also has gathering like this at the waist.

The gathers pinned in place before being 'secretly' sewn down to the bodice.

The gathers pinned in place before being ‘secretly’ sewn down to the bodice.

Tadaaa! Fabric now magically appears to sit right where you want it to!

Tadaaa! Fabric now magically appears to sit right where you want it to!

IMG_7360

Having sewn this up with two different fabrics, I think it would be very difficult to get your bias cut panels cut to exactly the right length so that when worn, the gathering would sit in the right place AND look attractive. It all depends on how your fabric behaves under tension – how tightly woven it is.

It was a challenge of the fun kind to get it so the stitches held the gathers attractively whilst not showing! The light in the photo above does rather give the location of my stitches away, but it didn’t appear to be visible whilst being worn.

THE LINING & TURN OF CLOTH:
I used a white crepe de chine silk to line both the bodice and the skirt. The pattern wanted the arm holes to be finished with some self-fabric binding – that was never going to happen!

Because of the white lining, I wanted to account for turn of cloth at the armholes, and I didn’t want stitches showing on the outside (so I used this technique) – but I forgot about this when I was tracing my seamlines. To account for it, I pinned the seam line of the lining 2mm out from the outer fabric seam line and sewed along this, resulting in armholes that don’t show the lining :)

IMG_7317

IMG_7318

The silk organza underlining helped a lot here as after pressing it in place – gave me a nice crisp fold that held the turn of cloth beautifully.

I finished off the lining to enclose all of the seams by fell stitching it to the skirt’s seamline.

CLOSURES
I used invisible zips on both dresses (down the centre back seam), finishing with a hook and eye at the top, which is hidden nicely by the ruffles at the neckline.

photo 4

Because I used french seams at the skirt though – there is always that difficult point where french seam meets zip. I get around this by making a perpendicular cut into the seam, which allows the seam to lay flat.

DRESS SHIELDS:
Perhaps a little on the unusual side – but I think we’ve all worn a silk top at some point and had perspiration make our fabric wet under the arms. And that damp silk really stands out because it appears dark!

I saw ready-made dress shields for sale when I was in New York, but it’s not something I’ve yet to come across here in Melbourne. There was an old thread on Artisan Square from 2006 about dress shields – but also mostly about using bought versions. Both versions of the book Couture Sewing Techniques (Claire Shaeffer) discusses them briefly, shows a picture and discusses how they were traditionally sewn.

IMG_7247

IMG_7255

For Nikoo’s dress (Andy is one of those people that doesn’t seem to sweat!) I incorporated built in dress shields, which I made from a layer of cotton calico covered in the white crepe de chin lining, tacked in place with catch stitch before sewing up the side seams. You can’t see them when she’s wearing the dress – and I checked in with her at the end of the night as to how well they worked – not a single sweat mark! Although… we were both rather inebriated at that point…

THE END RESULT:
Super floaty and elegant – nothing looks or feels more luxurious than a flowing floor length silk skirt! They all looked pretty good I thought :)

w140412_205

All professional photos in this post were by the amazing Todd and Alyda from Todd Hunter McGaw :)

wedding dress

My Wedding Dress

We were married under three 100 year old London Plane trees in Victoria’s high country in mid-April, just as the autumn leaves started to turn. I sewed my wedding dress (duh) and I don’t think I’ve been prouder of something I’ve achieved for myself – ever. It made the experience that much more special!!

I think photos convey what I want to share with you all better than words, so this is a selection that showcase the dress. More on the inspiration, fabrics, construction and lessons learned to follow…

Props to:
Leisa, my Fabric Fairy Godmother
Alessia and the crew @ Marfy – the best patterns out there – thank you!
Vikki Leigh Martin, for helping with proportion & fit
Susan Khalje, for enabling
And to Mr poppykettle, who took on the lions share of domestic duties and sat alone on the couch for many, many nights whilst I toiled away in the sewing room. He knows it was worth it ;)

You guys rock!

003

005

008 009

004

007

 

001

002

010 011 012 013 014

 

019

015

Attempting to convince my darling photo-bombing god daughter to stay out of the picture for a moment.... it would appear my negotiation skills need some work!

Attempting to convince my darling photo-bombing god daughter to stay out of the picture for just a moment…. I think my negotiation skills need some work!

017

021

020

Mr poppykettle made our wedding cake - from a sour cherry and chocolate fruit cake recipe that Melissa Fehr pointed me in the direction of. The top layer was altered to be gluten free (so I could partake in the cake eating) and I ate that whole layer myself. It was really, really good.

Mr poppykettle made our wedding cake – from a sour cherry and chocolate fruit cake recipe that Melissa Fehr pointed me in the direction of. The top layer was altered to be gluten free (so I could partake in the cake eating) and I ate that whole layer myself. It was really, really good.

He made it at home then put it all together the day before our wedding :)

This was the day before when it was putting it all together! :)

Neither of us as so good at the whole 'dancing' thing.

024

025

026 027 028

All photos (except the one of Trent icing the cake) were taken by Todd Hunter McGaw

Couture Sewing School: Day 5 & 6

Ah, the last two days of the Couture Sewing School. Hard to accept that it was coming to an end, and struggling to keep the mojo up to get lots done.

Highlights? I broke my first ever sewing needle:

IMG_6525

I made my first ever hand picked zipper, too. I’ve always been in an invisible zipper gal personally, but I can see the allure with this method. You get an incredible amount of control throughout the process, and I love how easy it is to get the top part of the zipper on that slight angle, which helps share the strain on the hook and eye which will eventually be at the top:

IMG_6669

What’s always interested me about this method is the potential for embellishment, like using beads in each stitch:

img_1597

But, it won’t be a regular thing for me. I prefer the invisible factor, plus unless you get your stitches perfectly distanced, the uneven puckering is not for me. I may still unpick this…

I learnt a new way of sewing pin-point turns – doing it in two passes, rather than the single swipe I’d always done (hit and miss). Having both pieces stay-stitched rather than just the piece you clip helps aligning it all up, too:

IMG_6670

Once I’d got the bodice permanently stitched together, I had some fun with the pleats. The pattern calls for topstitching along the basted lines you see here:

IMG_6671

As I’m not yet decided on whether or not I’ll do that, I’ve catch-stitched the pleats from the underside which will secure it all together should I decided not topstitch all the things:

IMG_6520

In other, equally-as-unexciting news, I started cutting out lining…

IMG_6673

Which is currently holding nearly all my pins to ransom as I’ve yet to get past the align-and-cut phase. There’s the option to either thread trace the lining… or to use carbon paper to trace the outline onto (in a light colour) and get your sewing lined up perfectly so none of it shows through. Indecision rains!

And lastly… I got the little overcoat fitted :) This is the part of the garment that would have been a lace overlay, but which I’m going to sew as a separate piece in this lovely mottled fabric. Had I made it in the macrame lace (as recommended), the darts would have been intentionally lost in the detail. To make a bit of a feature from them though, Susan converted them to two ‘french’ darts on the diagonal (in blue). It softens the shape and I really like the effect!

IMG_6674

By Saturday afternoon… people were leaving and there’s nothing I dislike more than having to say goodbye, especially to such wonderful, inspiring people!

I all but lost the mojo and spent the afternoon relaxing by starting to hand sew the first row of trim on my French Jacket… and just like that – it was all over. :)

IMG_6662

Couture Sewing School: Day 4

Since getting back home I’ve taken a break from sewing and blogging…  and I’ve probably been banned from leaving the country for such a long period ever again (nearly a month!) without taking the hubby-to-be along with me! In good news, I’ve just finished sewing my French Jacket, more on that another day soon. So it’s time to finish the Couture Sewing School series!

On Day 4 I focused pretty much entirely on inner foundations. First I basted together the Marfy corset to have it fitted – this was from a pattern a size smaller than I usually go for, so I was curious to see how it turned out, especially as it’s such a fitted garment. 

The trickiest thing with this style is the cups. You really can’t fit such a thing unless you’ve got some underwires in it – which I didn’t have. So the four changes marked below generally relate to the fit around my torso than anything. I’ll eventually take this apart, sew over the new adjusted seam lines, add in some boning and appropriately shaped and fitted underwires and then tackle the cups.

IMG_6518

But to be honest, it was a pretty awesome fit! Such great lines on this pattern, I really can’t wait to properly tackle it.

Meanwhile, Leisa next to me was also making this pattern to go as a foundation structure for her ballgown. I took a happy snap to document the location of her boning channels:

IMG_6507

She also brought along a new-to-me fabric – Sea Island Cotton. This stuff is apparently the bomb for creating lightweight inner foundations, and something Susan often used when she was a Wedding Dress couturier.

This cotton is biologically different to normal cotton because the length of the fibres used to make up the strands is much longer than in ‘normal’ cotton – which gives it the super smooth texture. Oh, and it’s breathable, lightweight and tightly woven with virtually no give along the grain or cross grain – making it perfect for foundation garments. It actually feels a bit like silk against the skin – incredibly smooth – and Susan says it doesn’t pill.

So I trace out my front bodice pieces onto some of this cotton – changing the three pieces on the bottom half of the bodice to be a single piece, then get to thread tracing. The structure will be sewn into the outer fabric bodice, and held in place by the side seams (this structure doesn’t extend around to the back).

IMG_6483

There’s going to be two layers of cotton here, which are sandwiched wrong sides together then sewn along to create the boning channels. Once it’s together, I get to play with ‘Bone-o-rama’ (the name of Susan’s case carrying the pre-cut lengths of steel spiral boning):

IMG_6503It’s the first time I’ve touched this stuff and I’m pleasantly surprised at how light, flexible and strong it is.

Quickly I realise I should have graded the seam allowances to have one shorter than the other, because that would have made it much simpler to slip the boning through… one particular spot didn’t want to behave and it took a lot of manipulation, pleading and shoving to get the bone through there.

IMG_6504

And the final result:

IMG_6505

As yet un-pressed, of course. The bizarre thing about sewing in this environment is that progress seems to trump getting the little things as good as they could be, where you can get away with it with little flow on effect, of course.  Trying to get as far through a garment as possible so as to learn as much as possible meant my sewing was a little sub-par for my usual taste. Ah well!

As this will only fit into the front of the bodice, I use the silk organza and the seam allowances at the back of the bodice to create some boning channels:

IMG_6513

And then I pin the foundation into the bodice and try my hardest to get it so there are no wrinkles from the outside when being worn:

IMG_6514

And all of a sudden it was 6pm.

As a bunch of us were staying at the same place, that night we organised to get together in the lobby to watch Project Runway, so I thought I’d have a night off homework (and to be fair, I was starting to feel a little thin on the ground…), but then  came downstairs to find Sarah busily sewing away on her French Jacket and Leisa sewing as well, so I raced back upstairs to grab mine in the add-break for a little sew-in in the lobby:

Tim Gun on the screen!

Tim Gun on the screen!

photo 2

A great way to finish another long day :)

Couture Sewing School: Day 3

The day of the skirt.

Having had plenty of time to think about the construction process whilst thread tracing, it’s clear to me that this front panel needs to be completed before any more of this dress is put together.

One thing I’ve learnt from sewing with Marfy patterns is that their seam lines always, always match up, and there is no line or marking that should be left behind. To paraphrase Susan – it’s like a soap opera – no part isn’t important!

It’s like putting a puzzle together though – you just have to keep persevering until you figure out where everything goes and which match points fit where.

IMG_6466

Above is after several iterations of me pinning everything in place to get the right ‘look’, but I was really struggling to get the wool crepe to behave in the fashion I wanted – the gathered part simply wouldn’t drape nicely. Unlike silk satin, the crepe just didn’t have the right ratio of fabric weight to drape, which was emphasised by the slightly angular position of two sewn in pleats to the left of the draped section (the two draped pleats with pins in them above).

From working through this, I got an appreciation for just how fabulous this would look made up in a heavy silk satin! However, the crepe responded better to being ‘gathered’ vertically rather than at a slight angle like the pattern dictates, so at Susan’s suggestion I omitted the two slightly angled sewn-in pleats at the start and changed the direction of the gathers to get the crepe to look better:

IMG_6473

This looks much better, although it means I’ll need to adjust the hem length to get a better length balance between the pleats. And you can see in the background Sarah’s French Jacket being made – I shudder to think of all the progress I would have made had I the work ethic of Sarah – her middle name surely must be productivity! Alas… I was too busy happily gossiping…

After lunch I get to work hand basting the bodice and skirt together so I can have it fitted again. This is done with a backstitch… slow work, but doing it by hand reduces the handling of your fabric – even the longest machine stitch is sewn tightly and this means it’s easier to remove (translate: less damage to your fabric).

Now is also probably a good time to say I’ve switched out the Marfy bodice for a Burda bodice – for no other reason that I wanted some more challenging design lines to maximise the learning potential from this week:

IMG_6470

After it all being basted I whack it on and have Susan cast an eye over it, whereby she says I’ll need to construct an inner foundation piece for support because I’m not going with the patterns original design of the lace overlay which otherwise would have held it all up.

By this point I’m so blase about lounging around in a state of undress that I’m really quite fine with posting rather lousy photos of myself on the internet:

IMG_1123

I start working on adjusting the bodice pattern pieces to create an inner corsolette that will be boned… and then two UPS boxes arrive…

img_1982

one of the two boxes…photo pinched from Sarah of Goodbye Valentino

It’s my wedding dress fabric!!!

I spotted it at Mendel Goldberg when we were supposed to be shopping for French Jacket fabric the previous week and couldn’t get it out of my head… so Susan helped me order it over the phone. It’s kinda killing me that I can’t show you all what it is – but it’s going to have to wait until next year. Sorry!

Before this trip I had spent a few days looking at and trying on wedding dresses, falling in love with one in particular. It was made from a very specific fabric which I was unable to find whilst in New York (well, actually I did find it, but not in the colour I was wanting), which was really disappointing. I had a ‘back-up’ dress concept from my second favourite from the dress-trying-on-expedition which was made from easily obtainable fabric, and had even gone so far as ordering a custom-made art-deco style bit of bling for it from M&J Trimming‘s bridal section (they have some amazing stuff!!!)… so I guess I’ll work that into a dress at some other point!

After opening up the boxes for a bit of emotional show and tell, I was rendered useless for the rest of the afternoon. I think I even gave myself a night off from homework. And that was Day 3!